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Top 10 Mysterious Places On Earth That Disappear Underwater

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Mysterious Places On Earth That Disappear Underwater

Our blue planet has many weird and mysterious places. What we are going to show you today are those places which appear and disappear depending upon the high and low tide. At high tides, these places submerge under water and when the tide is low, mysteriously these surface again.

This happens due to the phenomenon of tidal harmonics-the result of the intersection of the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun as well as the force generated with the earth spinning. If all these line up, high tide occurs.

Let’s have a look at these 10 places –

10. Passage Du Gois, France :

Passage-Du-Gois

Passage Du Gois

The Passage Du Gois is a natural 2.5 mile long road on the Atlantic coast of France, connecting the two town Île de Noirmoutier and Beauvoir-sur-mer. The stone paved road is considered to be one of the most dangerous roads in the world. It has been used since the 16th century. The road is usable only one and half hour before and after the lowest tide. If you one day decide to cross this passage, you better keep a track on time or you might have to abandon your car in the middle of to road and swim back to shore for safety. The road submerges underwater upto 13 feet.

9. Curio Bay, New Zealand:

Curio-Bay

Curio Bay

New Zealand is home to some of the stunning landscapes of planet earth. We have seen glimpses of it in the movie lord of the rings. Curio bay is not a famous landscape, but it is definitely breathtaking. It lies on the coastal line of the southern part of New Zealand. During low tides, the real beauty of this place is visible. The 12 mile underwater forest becomes visible when the water recedes. It is one of the most extensive fossilized Jurassic forest in the world, which is 180 million years old.

8. St. Michael’s Mount, England:

St.-Michael’s-Mount

St. Michael’s Mount

St. Michael’s Mount is an island to the South West of England, which is home to a medieval castle and church- the sort of place you’d expect to see in Game of Thrones! The island got its name because it is said that St. Michael appeared to a group of fishermen in the year 495 to warn the fisherman of certain peril! The interesting part here is the connecting stone paved road to the island. You can cross this passage during low tides in just a matter of minutes. But remember to keep track on high tides.

7. East Quoddy Lighthouse, United States:

East Quoddy Lighthouse

East Quoddy Lighthouse

East Quoddy Lighthouse is on Campobello Island, New Brunswick. In the 1820’s, trade between the island and the coast of Maine flourished, and it became a hive of activity for fishing and shipbuilding. The lighthouse was built to warn sailors that they were getting close to land. During low tides, the slippery rocks get exposed and you can walk to the island. But you have only one and half hour to cross and come back to mainland before the rocks disappear under water again. If you can’t keep up, you might have to wait there for 8 long hours till the next low tides.

6. Mont Saint Michel, France:

Mont-Saint-Michel

Mont-Saint-Michel

Mont-Saint-Michel is one of the most popular tourist attractions in France, and became a UNESCO world heritage site in 1979. The sanctuary is surrounded by medieval walls, with a series of buildings and towers that rise above the base, and the ancient abbey that stands over it all. The vast sand bay emerges with the low tides and you can walk across, but at low tides the bay submerges and the place become an island. But good news is that there is a permanent road now to get across.

5. The Manjuyod White Sandbar, Philippines:

The Manjuyod White Sandbar

The Manjuyod White Sandbar

Have you seen those images of bamboo huts sitting on stilts above the ocean? Well the Manjuyod White Sandbar is one of those places. It is located in the Philippines. The white sand bay couple of square miles in size is visible during low tides and you can walk across from one bamboo hut to another. But as the high tide approaches, the sand bay disappears into the blue.

4. Canadian Mural, Canada:

Canadian Mural

Canadian Mural

If you’ve ever looked out across a bay and thought the endless mass of grey concrete was rather depressing, then you might just change your mind after seeing the Bay of Fundy. The bay lies between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in Canada. It’s claim to fame is that you here you can experience the highest tidal range on earth, with the distance between low and high tide being as much as 52 feet.

3. Angel Road, Japan:

Angel Road, Japan

Angel Road, Japan

Angel Road is a stunning stretch of sand that can be found near the port of Tonosho, which is on the Shodoshima Island in the Seto Inland Sea of Japan. It connects the mainland with three smaller islands that lie close by but, because of the tides, the road is only revealed twice a day when the sea level is at its lowest.

2. Jindo Island, South Korea:

Jindo Island

Jindo Island

Every year, on the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula, something amazing happens. It attracts hundreds of thousands of people, both locals and tourists, and is a mass celebration. Known as the Jindo Sea-Parting festival, a natural phenomenon occurs that sees the northern part of the East China Sea open up to reveal a 1.8 mile pathway that connects Jindo Island with its neighboring island of Modo.

1. Green Lake, Austria:

Green Lake, Austria

Green Lake, Austria

This is perhaps by far, the most amazing place that vanishes underwater. The Green Lake, in Tragoess, Austria, is normally only about 3 feet deep for most of the year. Visitors go to see the beautiful scenery, and to sit on benches next to the water to enjoy the tranquility. There are small bridges to cross streams, and it looks like a perfect scene for a landscape painting. But, when the winter ends, the snow from the nearby mountains melt and flows into the lake, doubling the size of the lake. It completely floods the park up-to 36 feet of water.

Destinations

Dev Diwali At Varanasi: Few Facts About It- Your Next Destination

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Dev-Diwali-Varanasi

Celebrated each year on the Purnima of Karthik maas in the sacred city of Varanasi, Dev Deepawali or Dev Diwali is a festival of light as a mark of worshipping Lord Shiva for his victory over the demon Tripurasur. Don’t get confused between the Dev Diwali and Diwali. Dev Diwali is celebrated after 15 days after the Diwali Celebration. On this day, the demon Tripurasur (namely Tarakaksha, Viddyunmali and Kamalaksha) was beaten by Lord Shiva and all the Devtas were freed from his prison.

Celebrating this auspicious occasion, all devotees come together and take a dip at the holy Ganga. Then, they offer their prayers with flowers and light clay lamps (Diyas) in the evening. The ritual continues day and night and the thousands of deepam lights up every staircases of Varanasi Ghats.

According to Hindu mythology, three demons Tarakaksha, Viddyunmali and Kamalaksha were killed by lord Shiva on this day. Lord Shiva was the only one who could killed all the three demons.

According to myth, all the three demons got one palace each i.e. one of gold, one of silver and one of iron and these three places were in constant motion. All the three places were supposed to be destroyed at the same time, but the constant motion made it impossible.

Lord Shiva came to rescue with the help of Vishwakarma who made a special divine weapon known as Pushpastra. This special weapon was aimed at all three at the same time and eventually all three were destroyed and all the Devtas were rescued. All of them returned to Swarga on Karthik Mass Purnima.

So this is the story behind the celebration of the festival of light, Dev Diwali. This time, it will be celebrated on 3rd March, 2017. May this Dev Dipawali bring all the joy to you. If you are planning to spend some time in Varanasi, book a ticket in advance and enjoy. Don’t forget to book your hotel in advance as well.

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